What is WiFi?

A wireless network uses radio waves, just like cell phones, televisions and radios do. In fact, communication across a wireless network is a lot like two-way radio communication. Here's what happens:

1. A computer's wireless adapter translates data into a radio signal and transmits it using an antenna.

2. A wireless router receives the signal and decodes it. The router sends the information to the Internet using a physical, wired Ethernet connection.

The process also works in reverse, with the router receiving information from the Internet, translating it into a radio signal and sending it to the computer's wireless adapter.

There are many WiFi advantages to users. Let's have a closer look at them:

  • WiFi uses unlicensed radio spectrum and does not require regulatory approval for individual deployers.
  • It allows local area networks (LANs) to be setup with cabling. The can reduce associated costs of network connection and expansions. Places where cables cannot be run, such as outdoor areas and historical buildings can use wireless LANs.
  • WiFi products are extensively available in the market. There are different brands of access points and user's network interfaces are able to inter-operate at a very basic service level.
  • Prices are considerably lower as competition amongst vendors' increases.
  • WiFi networks can support roaming. This allows mobile users with laptop computer to be able to move from one access point to another.
  • Numerous access points and network interfaces support various degrees of encryption to protect traffic from interception
  • WiFi has a set of global standards. Not like the cellular carriers, the same WiFi users can work in different countries around the world at all time.


Wi-Fi at College:
  • 90% of college students say Wi-Fi access is as essential to education as classrooms and computers.
  • 57% say they wouldn’t go to a college that doesn’t have free Wi-Fi.
  • 79% say that without Wi-Fi access, college would be a lot harder.
  • 60% agree that widely available Wi-Fi on campus is an indication that a school cares about its students.


Wi-Fi at Home:
  • 1. Computer mobility. Notebook computers and other portable devices are much affordable than they were a few years ago. With a mobile computer and wireless home network, you aren't chained to a network cord and can work on the couch, on your porch, or wherever in the house is most convenient at the moment.


  • 2. No unsightly wires. Businesses can afford to lay cable under their floors or inside walls. But most of us don't have the time or inclination to fuss with this in our home. Unless you own one of the few newer homes pre-wired with network cable, you'll save substantial time and energy avoiding the cabling mess and going wireless.


  • 3. Wireless is the future. Wireless technology is clearly the future of networking. In building a wireless home network, you'll learn about the technology and be able to teach your friends and relatives. You'll also be better prepared for future advances in network technology coming in the future.